War on Terrorism

Saturday, July 20, 2019

DOD Identifies Army Casualty


The Department of Defense announced today the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Inherent Resolve.

Sgt. William Edward Friese, 30, from Rockport, West Virginia, died July 18, 2019 in Camp Buehring, Kuwait, from a non-combat related incident. The incident is under investigation.

Friese was assigned to 821st Engineer Company, 1092nd, Engineer Battalion, 111th Engineer Brigade, Summersville, West Virginia.  

For more information regarding Sgt. Willliam Edward Friese, members of the media may contact Maj. Holli Nelson, State Public Affairs Officer, West Virginia National Guard at 304-389-8184 or by email at holli.r.nelson.mil@mail.mil.

Sunday, July 14, 2019

DOD Identifies Army Casualty


The Department of Defense announced today the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Freedom's Sentinel.

Sgt. Maj. James G. Sartor, 40, of Teague, Texas, died July 13, 2019, in Faryab Province, Afghanistan, as a result of injuries sustained from enemy small arms fire during combat operations. This incident is under investigation.

Sartor was assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 10th Special Forces Group (Airborne), Fort Carson, Colorado.
For more information regarding Sgt. Maj. James G. Sartor, media may contact Lt. Col. Loren Bymer, U.S. Army Special Operations Command Public Affairs at (910) 432-3383 or loren.bymer@socom.mil.

Friday, July 12, 2019

Tennessee Prison Inmate Facing Federal Charges For White Powder Mailing Hoax


NASHVILLE, Tenn. – July 11, 2019 – Jeffery Durance, 36, of Gatlinburg, Tennessee, and an inmate of the Tennessee Department of Correction, was indicted yesterday by a federal grand jury, charging him with mailing a threatening communication and conveying false information while threatening to use a Weapon of Mass Destruction (WMD), announced U.S. Attorney Don Cochran for the Middle District of Tennessee.

The indictment alleges that on September 6, 2018, Durance mailed an envelope containing a white powder to the Commissioner of the Tennessee Department of Correction, Tony Parker.  The indictment also alleges that the envelope was sent through the U.S. Mail and contained a threatening letter, which caused a reasonable belief that the powder contained a biological agent or toxin, which would constitute a WMD.  The receipt of the envelope at the Tennessee Tower State Office Building in Nashville caused a disruption in services until the powder was determined to be an inert material.  

If convicted, Durance faces up to 10 years in prison for mailing a threatening communication and up to five years in prison for threatening to use a WMD.

This case was investigated by the FBI; the Tennessee Highway Patrol; the Tennessee Department of Correction; the Metropolitan Nashville Police Department; and the Metropolitan Nashville Fire Department.  Assistant U.S. Attorney Robert S. Levine is prosecuting the case.

The defendant is presumed innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.