War on Terrorism

Saturday, November 03, 2007


Terry Lynn Nichols (born April 1, 1955) was a U.S. Army veteran who was convicted of being an accomplice to Timothy McVeigh, the man convicted of murder in the bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building (Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, U.S, April 19, 1995), which claimed 168 lives. Nichols was convicted of eight counts of manslaughter in a United States District Court and was sentenced to life imprisonment in ADX Florence, a super max prison in Florence, Colorado. The state of Oklahoma then charged him with capital murder. The McAlester, Oklahoma trial started March 1, 2004. The jury selection and the testimony phase began on March 22 and he was convicted on August 9, of 161 counts of first-degree murder. As in the Federal trial, the jury spared him the death penalty and he was sentenced to life in prison without parole.

Nichols since then has alleged that a high-ranking FBI official was directing Timothy McVeigh in the plot to blow up a government building and that plans may have changed the original target of the attack, according to a new affidavit filed in U.S. District Court in Utah on February 9, 2007.

Somewhere around 27 October 2000, while working as a Lieutenant Jail Commander for the Oklahoma County Jail facility, I was temporarily re-assigned to guard Terry Nichols. My duties were to insure that he did not escape, would eat three meals a day, receive his one-hour exercise period three times a week, did not communicate with any unauthorized person, that he received his proper cleaning supplies daily to clean his cell, to monitor anything or anyone having access to his living quarters area.


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